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20121211
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alert. tonight, michigan, the home of the american automobile industry, state that has been dominated by big labor unions, is now a right to work state. michigan's republican governor has just signed a bill in to law ending union ability to force workers to pay dues. february they are not in the union. democrats are predicting a warning of blood in the streets. here is what the governor said moments ago about why he supported the legislation. >> for two strong reasons. first of all, worker choice. the freedom to choose. and the concept of more and better jobs for our state. i think it was a good thing to sign the legislation and move forward. >> bret: this makes michigan the 24th right to work state in the u.s. let's get an update now from the michigan capital. correspondent mike tobin is live in lansing. good evening. >> good evening, bret. what you can't see tonight in darkness is a column of state troopers surrounding the for's office building. they are armed with baton and wearing riot gear. from behind that column of protection, governor snyder made his announcement that michigan
'm brooke baldwin. right to it. thanks for being with me. we want to begin in michigan. take a look. >> we are -- >> union. >> the sound of protesters chanting, filled the state house gallery in lansing, while inside the capital chamber the republican-led legislature passed not just one, two right to work bills. one was for the public workers. the second, which passed moments ago, covers workers in the private sector. with the passing of both bills here, michigan will become the 24th right to work state, all that is left for that to happen, for the republican governor to sign it. rick snyder promises to do exactly that, probably tomorrow. look at more pictures we have for you here. more than 12,000 protesters gathered in freezing temperatures. i think i saw some snow falling earlier there in lansing as the lawmakers were inside, voting. and, against the odds, democrats waged a final losing battle. poppy harlow, let me bring you in there, amidst all of this in lansing. set the scene for me, now that we know, poppy, both the bills passed. what is the reaction like in the crowd? >> we knew th
. let's begin here, a threat to the strength of the union. it's playing out moment by moment in michigan today. one of the most heavily unionized states in america. that state is on the verge of passing something called a right to work law that would make it illegal to force anyone to join a union or pay union dues if they want to take the job. you've got live pictures here in front of you from the state capitol in michigan. that's lansing. thousands of protesters, none too happy with those challenging this law. more than 600,000 michigan workers are part of a union. they belong. and if you do the math with the population, that works out to nearly 18% of the state's workforce. much higher than the national percentage as well. our alison kosik has been story all morning long and the noise level as well as the number of people seems to be growing. >> reporter: that's right. you know, as the day has progressed, you know, there's well over, i would say, 2,000 people out here. that is short, though, of the 1,000 that was expected. inside the capitol, though, there's a lot going on. for one, t
on the michigan state capital in lansing as apartment of a troeshlg union battle that's about to unfold. at issue, the so called "right to work." legislation is being pushed through the republican lawmakers that could come to a final vote as early as today. the law would might illegal to require an employee to pay union dues as a condition of their employment. opponents say the legislation threatens to weaken the influence of labor unions in a state that is home to the auto industry and has a long history of organized labor. during a visit to detroit yesterday where he intendeded to focus on the fiscal clivgs president obama waded head first into the union battle. >> what we shouldn't be doing is trying to take away your right to bargain for better wages. we shouldn't be doing that. you know, these so-called right-to-work laws, that i don't have to do with economics. they have everything do with politics. what they're really talking about is giving you the right to work for less money. you only have to look to michigan where workers were instrumental in reviving the auto industry to see how union
viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: michigan, a state considered a cradle of the union movement, today struck a blow against organized labor. the republican-dominated state legislature approved laws that deny unions the right to require membership in exchange for a job. more than 12,000 people gathered outside the state capitol in lansing to protest the move. inside, they chanted "shame on you!" at republican governor rick snyder. late today he signed the bill. for more, we're joined by micheline maynard, a contributor to forbes.com and former detroit bureau chief for the "new york times," and by bill ballenger, editor of "inside michigan politics." welcome to you both. mickey maynard. first, this has all happened very quickly. what precipitated this right now. >> there were two things that happened, judy. first of all in november there was a ballot proposal that unions floated that would have outlawed right-to-work. it would have put that into the state constitution. that proposal failed because it was proposed at the same time as a lot of constitutional amendments. people just
some have fled benghazi. jenna: a big day for michigan, one of the most pro-labor states historically in this nation about to become a right-to-work state. the uns are not going down without a fight. they are staging massive protests. i'm jenna lee. rick: i'm rick folbaum in for jon scott. as massive amounts of demonstrators state troopers with tear gas and batons stand at the ready. governor rick snyder vowing to sign the right to work legislation as soon at it hits his desk. the measure means employees will decide for themselves whether they want to join and financially support a union the governor says that could create more jobs, others are worried that the legislation could weaken the union's power and lead to lower wages for everyone. >> it is a big deal because what they want us to do, they want to reduce workers down to working for less. it is not about, more jobs. the jobs are going to be there. about what conditions you work under. we want to basically work, rite to work and have benefits and feed the middle class like we were. and this legislation is trying to reduce the mi
at michigan state house. there's a vote from the house that has passed the right to work bill. want to bring in alison kosik for the latest. this is controversial, allison. how are people responding? >> reporter: there's not much response here. what's going on inside the capitol is this. two votes happening in the house, one passed as you said, 51-48. that is the public union portion of the right-to-work law. that passed the house. now with the house is going to do is vote on a senate bill on private unions and that is also expected to pass. once that does if it does, it's expected that measure will head to governor rick snider's desk where he is expected to sign it. i did talk to protesters here, i let them know that the first part did pass. one teacher i talked with who came out today said they're not listening to us standing out here. at the same time another person in favor of the measure came up to me and said, what's the latest? i said the first measure passed and she jumped up and said, yeah. you are feeling the tension start to happen here. one thing that happened 40 minutes ago a te
, brooke. happening now, thousands of angry demonstrators swarm michigan state capital for a fight over labor unions. >>> here in washington, republicans turn the tables on president obama. we're going to tell you what specific information they are now demanding. >>> and who was she? you're going to find out why a century's old mystery may be closer to a solution. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." we begin with today's dramatic defeat for union workers in the industrial's heartland. this was the scene as republicans pushed through right to work bills saying that they don't have to pay union dues in in order to get a job. on lookers chanted, shame on you after the vote. this is a watershed moment because michigan is the same as countless union struggles, including this 1932 march where five people died and dozens were injured when unemployed workers were attacked by police and ford motor company security guards. after decades of gains, fewer than 12% of u.s. workers now belong to unions. in michigan, it's fewer than 18%. cnn's poppy harlow is at the state capital in lansi
in michigan could not stop lawmakers from passing bills that hurt union power. this could have a major impact on unions nationwide. the feds accuse a big bank of doing business with iran, cuba and libya and mexican drug cartels to the tune of billions and billions of dollars. who did they arrest? nobody in who are they trying to arrest? nobody. there is a fine. we will get to that. put down the cough syrup. pick up chocolate candy. researchers say chocolate could be more effective treatment in treating the common cough. that is all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b" today. first from fox at 3:00 in new york city, a major blow to labor unions wait for the michigan governor's signature. today, state lawmakers pass add measure that weakens labor unions while crowds of protesters rallied need and outside the statehouse. the demonstration is getting ugly. get the [blank] camera. >>shepard: the demonstrators are fighting the republican legislature and republican governor who says he will sign the so-called right-to-work bill into law. it would make it illegal to force
of a deal, although i have to tell you. the president sounded pretty optimistic when he was in michigan about the possibility of us going off the cliff and falling into a second recession. here's what he had to say about the possibility. >> consumer spending is going to go down. that means you've got less customers, businesses get fewer profits. they hire fewer workers. you go on a downward spiral. >> downward spiral, not a very optimistic statement, although the president went on to say he's still hopeful both sides will come together. we're told he had a phone call today with the senate majority leader harry reid but no more phone calls or visits from speaker boehner. it's still on hold whether they'll move forward on a deal. >> shepard: looks like speaker boehner is getting pressure from the moderates in the party and certainly from the right. >> reporter: no doubt about it. bob corker from tennessee was on "fox news sunday" yesterday. he gave fo voice to something you're hearing from an increasing number of republicans right now which is maybe they should give in on raising taxes on
for michigan and the u.s. are expected to protest at the state's capital building today over a proposed right to work bill. this would prohibit consumers to pay more. governor rick snyder says he'll sign it. michigan will become the 24th u.s. right to work staid state. >>> and cnbc is taking to washington today as we send becky quick, larry kudlow and jim cramim cramer to the white . they'll be leading off with a special mission critical rise above d.c. report. it's part tax. read, becky? >> like you said, we are occupying washington. this is where we've camped out all night. there's been all this talk about the fiscal cliff. we know it is fact approaching. we know it is something that would threaten not only the united states economy, but the economies around the globe. if we go over that cliff, there will be steep cuts and spending and steep tax increases that would automatically kick in. what we're doing here today is talking to our elected officials, talking to people who are involved in these talks, trying to figure out what will happen, where we are and if there's any way to avoid that
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11